Blog

Just as it is important to get enough exercise and maintain a healthy diet, obtaining a healthy amount of sleep is important for physical and mental health.

Abigail Strang, MD
Pediatric Sleep Physician at Nemours, A.I. du Pont Hospital for Children

Our Pilot faculty is trained to help children work with ADHD, as well as other needs, but I understand that many parents are not equally equipped. So, as you go into the summer months and look for ways to engage, educate, and entertain your children, I recommend...

According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 15-20% of children in the United States have a language-based disability. The National Center for Learning Disabilities, 1 in 5 children in America have learning differences like dyslexia or ADHD. If you have a child with one of these learning differences, you know that the effects don’t stop at the classroom door. 

At Pilot, children enter into an environment where they can participate in service-based, active learning. Every child’s educational experience is designed for them and constantly adapted to support the child’s skills and needs. Once the students begin to experience success, confidence, and self-esteem come naturally.

Children look to the adults in their lives for cues on how to respond to the unexpected. Modeling resilience, kindness, and good humor in a stressful time is one of the most important gifts we can give our children. Below are some best practices to help children and families cope with the new realities of life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ongoing COVID-19 situation is causing many emotions for each of us – fear, uncertainty, impatience, boredom, and the list goes on. Our Pilot students are “our children” and I think about them so much during this time. I know they have many questions and we seem to have only a few answers. So, I’ve turned to our own Pilot staff of expert therapists and teachers as well as outside medical professionals for their insight on how to help our children.

Our children look to us to create normalcy even when we struggle to find it in our own day. It seems we are inundated with advice about what we should and shouldn't be saying to them. Ultimately, children seek truth and reassurance. It is important that we answer their questions honestly while being mindful of their developmental stage and not be fooled, at times, by their pseudo-sophistication.

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